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mozillawebmaker:

Help Mozilla set the Standard for Web Literacy
The Mozilla Foundation has a vision of a web literate planet. We’ve built some tools to help with this and now we’re asking the question: What are the skills, competencies and literacies necessary to read, write and participate on the Web - now and in the future?
Since February, we’ve been meeting to discuss, both on our weekly calls and on the Mozilla Webmaker list, what to include and, more recently, how to present the whole thing.
This is our first draft. 
We’ll be launching a Beta version in June and we’re looking for your feedback. Let us know what you think by:
commenting on this overview post
using this feedback form
joining the weekly community calls

mozillawebmaker:

Help Mozilla set the Standard for Web Literacy

The Mozilla Foundation has a vision of a web literate planet. We’ve built some tools to help with this and now we’re asking the question: What are the skills, competencies and literacies necessary to read, write and participate on the Web - now and in the future?

Since February, we’ve been meeting to discuss, both on our weekly calls and on the Mozilla Webmaker list, what to include and, more recently, how to present the whole thing.

This is our first draft.

We’ll be launching a Beta version in June and we’re looking for your feedback.

Let us know what you think by:

  1. commenting on this overview post
  2. using this feedback form
  3. joining the weekly community calls
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As promised, this version leaves behind the older Internet Explorer 6, 7, and 8 browsers. In return it is smaller, faster, and can be used in JavaScript environments where the code needed for old-IE compatibility often causes problems of its own.

(Source: decodering)

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v2.1 update plans

Packfire Framework came a long way to be where we are today. The framework now empowers research projects as back end data servers and controllers, such as the Travel Assistant for the Visually Impaired (TAVI).

With the will for continuous progress, Packfire will be releasing a version 2.1 on 15 April 2013 sporting the following new upgrades, improvements and new features:

  • Better IoC dependency distribution using Packfire FuelBlade
  • Config and Flash message view filters
  • Security Analysis page
  • Backend Administration Webpages
  • Improved Composer package loading and integration
  • several minor bug fixes and greater code testing coverage
  • minor code speed up and improvements
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Sam-Mauris Yong, CEO & Co-Founder of HeartCode development team and developer of Packfire, shares on how developers can improve Git project flows to manage complexity better through branches, tags and Github pull requests.

Read more at https://speakerdeck.com/mauris/github-project-flow

Sam-Mauris Yong, CEO & Co-Founder of HeartCode development team and developer of Packfire, shares on how developers can improve Git project flows to manage complexity better through branches, tags and Github pull requests.

Read more at https://speakerdeck.com/mauris/github-project-flow

Link

Some functions (fgetcsv, fputcsv for example) require a stream handle to work with. Similarly you have methods within zend_pdf to expect to read and write image data from a stream.

This can be inconvenient at times when you already have the data sitting in a variable. A way of getting around the…

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dkalab:

Happy New Year 2013

Happy 2013 everyone!

dkalab:

Happy New Year 2013

Happy 2013 everyone!

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Upcoming Projects and Updates

First of all, Merry Christmas to all (:

More code, less talking. That’s what happened for the past few weeks. Nevertheless, we came up with great projects that we are sharing open source on Github. These projects were created to solve many challenges that web developers or software engineers face commonly. Here are some of the projects:

[CLI] means that the project runs as a command-line interface application in the form of a PHAR binary. [Composer] represents that the project can be installed and used by others through Packagist and Composer installation.

  • PDC for PHP: [CLI] a smart little worker that helps you to check for missing class dependencies by analyzing your source code and checking against PSR-0 namespace and autoloading. Makes you code faster as you spend less time trying to fix a misspelled namespace.

  • Packfire Torch: [CLI] a web asset management tool for you to keep images and JavaScript libraries out of your version control. Torch installs web assets from any source just like how Composer install components.

  • Packfire Options: [Composer] A PHP-implementation of NDesk.Options (C#) using Closures and callbacks to help you effectively parse CLI arguments across platforms.

  • Packfire Concrete: [Composer] A small library that provides toolset for PHAR compilation similar to how Composer does it. Used by PDC and Torch to compile themselves into PHAR binaries. CLI version coming soon.

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Merry Christmas everyone. Feliz Navidad!

Merry Christmas everyone. Feliz Navidad!

(Source: nevver, via thenextweb)

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Setting Exit Code in PHP without exiting immediately

We all know that in a PHP script, you can return an exit code CLI-style using the exit language construct: exit(2); Exit codes have been very widely used in CLI tools such as Git or apt-get to tell the calling script that there may be an error of sort and the operation was not successful. This makes a great experience for an end-user.

However, the exit call assigns the exit code and immediately terminates the script. Sometimes you just want to set the exit code, do some work then terminate the script and that can’t happen.

The solution is to use shutdown hooks (the question was about Java, but thanks to Packfire Framework’s ShutdownTaskManager you can quickly do the same).

$this->service('shutdown')->add('exitCode', function(){
    exit(3);
});
doMoreWorkAfterSettingExitCode();

This allows you to do more work after setting the exit code to your PHP script. Sweet and simple!

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wired:

For everyone who enjoyed the very adorable “Dumb Ways to Die” viral video, here’s a wonderful little spoof about all the things Curiosity could find on Mars. 

Facehuggers, anyone? 

(Source: Wired)